Every once in a while an idea comes along that's so appealing - so obviously right - that we'll blame anything but the idea if the product fails. "Sure," we say when someone takes a stab at it and bombs, "they gave it a good shot - but their execution was all wrong. We'll be the ones to get it right."  

Increasingly, wearable cameras are feeling like one of those seductive dead-ends. The idea that we would want to record everything we see is so natural and obvious that it's got to be a winner, right?    

This weekend Snapchat stepped into the ring with a fashionable pair of their own video glasses, called Snapchat Spectacles. Learning from the mistakes of Google Glass, they're aiming for influencers, not geeks. And unlike the various other life-tracking cameras that have come and gone, they've got an enormously popular sharing platform already in place for all the content users will be shooting. So are Spectacles a sure thing?  

It's not wrong that everyone wants their lives to be a movie. But the key insight is that we don't want to be that movie's camera operator; we want to be its star. This is why selfie sticks sell by the millions while the Looxcie remains a footnote. As much as we all love to hate it, the selfie stick at least acknowledges that good content needs a focal point; a personality. Spectacles expect us to be altruistic enough to make our friends those stars - but if it's our video, we want to be in it.

If there's going to be a massive hit in the flagging world of cameras and video hardware, we would put our money on autonomous drones. As drones get cheaper and their software continues to advance, it seems increasingly likely that our most shareable moments will be captured by a tiny flying camera, loyally circling around us while our hands are free to make avocado toast, or free-climb El Capitan, or cradle an elderly pug in a top hat. And that way, our followers will always see our best angle.